Balancing what we know, what we taste, and what we describe.

Have I told you that my first solid food was tofu? That was the first of many foods my parents introduced me to as a kid. I didn’t eat much off the kids menu - I just shared whatever my parents were eating. And since they were studying Chinese, we ate a lot of Chinese food, often at dinners where the primary language was Chinese.

At the time I’m not so sure I appreciate the opportunity to taste geoduck, or scallops stuffed into cucumbers, or szechuan peppers. But my parents at the time applied a very simple rule, and it’s one I still use to this day - try everything at least once.

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Listen, help them grow, and give them away: tips for managers fostering coffee people's careers

It’s seems like the season is upon us: the time to shop for new jobs in coffee. There – the secret’s out!

There are a few seasons each year in coffee, one right around expo, and another in the fall, just before holiday shopping season, that people seem ready for a change at work. This time can be a struggle, personally and professionally, for both employers and employees.

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5 Customer Service Mandatory Minimums

There are five pretty straightforward standards, that are just that – standards. Or maybe I should say baseline measurements. As in, if these things aren’t done, I’m not staying in your space. If these aren’t done, this is where your team needs to focus its practice!

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Dear Company: Who are you?

The following is an exercise that uses some of the questions I ask that help process why a deviation exists between written ideas and your team's daily actions. Hopefully it will help you better understand your company’s identity and next steps to align with or change what it is now. The first step is admitting you may not be exactly who you say you are.

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Moving on: A graceful exit strategy

Ok. So you’ve done the things. You’ve worked with your manager. You’ve tried to advance internally. Or your dream position doesn’t exist within your current company – or it’ll take 20 more years to get there.

You’ve done everything you can do. It’s time. Let’s move on. Here’s how.

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